Painting Robots

We design all in one Robotic Integration Solutions for Outstanding Painting Robots Performance

Painting Robots Overview

We automatically think of the automotive industry when we consider the use of robots for painting, long lines of robots weaving their way around the inside and outside of car bodies.

Of course, this is an area where painting robots have been working for many decades now but we are seeing a new interest in paint robots for much smaller applications that have traditionally been carried out by hand.

Spray painting is typically a task that is unpleasant for humans and also in a lot of cases an environment that is toxic as well. This leads to one big advantage in using robots for this role as they are able to take on this potentially unpleasant and dangerous work.

A robotic painting installation is made of a number of principal elements outlined below:

Basic Single Pass System Painting Robot Integration

Main Elements of Painting Robot Cell

Top 5 robotic Painting

The Robot Manipulator

The Robot Manipulator itself will carry out the painting movements over the part or parts to be sprayed. The manipulator will have a high degree of freedom of movement to allow for smooth and fluid trajectories around the part or parts to be sprayed.

Paint robots are usually designed to contain the paint application piping.  In addition, colour changers within the structure of the arm of the robot eliminates the risk of cables and hoses snagging and contamination from paint material.

It is possible that the material being sprayed when vaporised can bring rise to an explosion risk. In this case, the robot will need to have the appropriate Atex protection rating to comply with the Atex rating of the zone that it will be working in. 

This is an important consideration for any new cell so we will consider this subject in a bit more detail.

Painting Robot Atex Rating

The robot manufacturer will indicate the rating for their robot ranges. For example in the case of the FANUC range of paint robots: All FANUC paint robots are explosion proofed and fully ATEX compliant for category 2 and Group IIG (previously zone 1)

For any new project it will be necessary to establish the Atex rating for the zone where the application will take place, the HSE directs that:

Employers must classify areas where hazardous explosive atmospheres may occur into zones. The classification given to a particular zone, and its size and location depend on the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere occurring and its persistence if it does.

A mixture of dangerous substances with air, under atmospheric conditions, in the form of gases, vapours, mist or dust in which, after ignition has occurred, combustion spreads to the entire unburned mixture. Atmospheric conditions are commonly referred to as ambient temperatures and pressures. That is to say temperatures of –20°C to 40°C and pressures of 0.8 to 1.1 bar.

Zone 0

A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of dangerous substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is present continuously or for long periods or frequently.

Equipment category 1 (1G/1D) – Very high level of protection

Zone 1

A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of dangerous substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally.

Equipment category 2 (2G/2D) – High level of protection

Zone 2

A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of dangerous substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

Equipment category 3 (3G/3D) – Normal level of protection

Zone 20: A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is present continuously, or for long periods or frequently.

Equipment category 1 (1G/1D) – Very high level of protection

Zone 21:  A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally. Equipment category 2 (2G/2D) – High level of protection

Zone 22:  A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

Equipment category 3 (3G/3D) – Normal level of protection

The Robot Applicator

The Applicator which is mounted on the robot flange help the robot to apply the material.

There are different types of applicator depending on the material and coverage required. For example we have:

  • Air based spray guns supplying paint via a nozzle with control of paint flow.
  • Airless spray guns supplying paint via a nozzle with control of paint flow.
  • Electrostatic spray guns with HT to provide greater material transfer.
  • Rotary bell type applicators with control of the fan shape and HT.
  • Mixing systems for materials with catalyst.
Robotic painting applicator
Durr EcoSupply for painting robot
Shown above is the Durr EcoSupply P standardised modular paint supply system. This system employs pig technology and is equally suited to water-based and solvent-borne paints.

The Paint Supply System

The Distribution or Paint Supply System brings the material to the robot and ultimately the applicator. When considering paint application, whether manual or robotic, the storage and supply of the material(s) to the gun needs to be taken into account. Some of the main elements being:

  • Agitators for correct mixing of the material in the storage containers.
  • Pumping systems for taking the material from the storage containers through the supply network to the base of the robot.
  • Fluid pressure and air regulators for fluid control.
  • Control system for managing the distribution process.

Painting ROBOTS

Phoenix works with the most well-known suppliers of painting equipment and all robot manufacturers such as KUKA, ABB, FANUC, and MOTOMAN robots. We have vast experience working with the automotive painting assembly line.

MAIN ROBOT APPLICATIONS

Painting Robots

We tend to think of the automotive industry when we consider the use of painting robots. Today, we are seeing a new interest in paint robots for smaller applications.

Milling Robots

Milling cell brings a high level of flexibility and accuracy because industrial robots can produce high-quality, complex and exceptional geometric parts.

Welding Robots

Robotic welding systems help companies gain a competitive advantage over those companies that have not made the transition to welding automation.

Assembly Line robots

Industrial robots are very useful in an automated assembly line operations, improving process efficiency at low operational cost and savings costs.

Palletising Robots

Palletising robots build up layers of products for shipment usually onto pallets. When the pallet is full the operator will remove the completed pallet.

Trimming & Cutting Robots

Robotic cutting and trimming robot application is the process to remove any material to follow a predetermined path.

Turnkey Industrial Robot Arms

Phoenix integrates and installs a complete painting robot cell or painting assembly line from initial design and consultation to manufacture.  As an integrator, we provide robot trainingrobot programmingrobot simulation, commissioning, and technical support.